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PostPosted: Sep 02, 2017 1:45 pm 
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For sake of variety, some good news:

Georgia Power Files to Complete Vogtle Expansion


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PostPosted: Sep 03, 2017 12:12 am 
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Does anyone know whether competing reactors like the VVER, Hualong 1, APR 1400 or EPR 1600, use canned coolant pumps like the AP1000 ?


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PostPosted: Sep 03, 2017 5:17 am 
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Not as I understand it.

Additionally I am not sure if the AP1000 could be referred to as a 'true' canned rotor pump.
Whilst the rotor is indeed hermetically sealed from the outside world and requires no seals, as far as I can tell the barrier is actually outside the stator coils, it appears to actually be a 'wet stator' pump.

Apparently significant design effort was invested in an XLPE cable insulation system that could survive contact with reactor fluid for long periods, they are cable wound and potentially quite high voltage.


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PostPosted: Sep 03, 2017 6:23 am 
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Yes, the AP1000 is technically not using canned rotor pumps, as the stator is wet as well, so wet motor or canned motor pump would be a better technical description. I think they switched during uprating from AP600 to AP1000; likely canned rotors for the higher capacity pumps required were considered too difficult or inefficient, perhaps. ABWRs and any other modern BWRs use wet stator type pumps, running fine for decades, though they are much smaller in rating per pump.

CAP-1400 is looking at either canned rotor or wet motor pumps. Some mention of at least one VVER offering using this.

If these MW class canned rotor/wet stator pumps can be implemented succesfully, there's a potentially enormous market for these things - especially outside the application for PWR coolant pumps. Refineries, steam plants, air separation units, you name it.


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PostPosted: Sep 03, 2017 12:44 pm 
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Cyril R wrote:
For sake of variety, some good news:

http://ansnuclearcafe.org/2017/08/31/ge ... MTUAx.dpbs
"The expected completion dates are now November 2021 for Vogtle Unit 3, and one year later for Unit 4." Thanks for the post, Cyril. In a related Toshiba item:
The cycle works like this: the plant operators initially feed pure oxygen, carbon dioxide, and natural gas into a combustor, which ignites the gas. The main by-products from that process are hot water and a lot of supercritical CO2, which acts as an efficient "working fluid" [better than steam] for driving the adjacent turbine. In turn, the carbon dioxide goes through a series of compressors, pumps, and heat exchangers, all of which help recuperate as much of the heat as possible and return the carbon dioxide to the beginning of the cycle.
The article omits the "turbine" is a Toshiba creation with patented metal alloys.

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PostPosted: Sep 03, 2017 12:56 pm 
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Hot water and supercritical CO2 mixed together? Sounds pretty tricky. You better have some fancy, corrosion-resistant alloys ready.

What does this have to do with Toshiba and Westinghouse?


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PostPosted: Sep 03, 2017 1:11 pm 
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Cyril R wrote:
Hot water and supercritical CO2 mixed together? Sounds pretty tricky. You better have some fancy, corrosion-resistant alloys ready.

What does this have to do with Toshiba and Westinghouse?
The turbine is Toshiba's, as I wrote. And their alloys are new and patented. This is a demonstration plant and many are eager to see the turbine perform. The relevance I felt was that Toshiba bailed on Westinghouse nuclear—and that's the topic here. This discussion so far is centered around the Westinghouse AP1000. And if the Allam Cycle scCO2 Toshiba turbine works and goes into production, that inaugurates scCO2 turbos in commercial power generation related to PCS in general no matter what the heat source—relevant to the namesake of this forum! I'd be interested to hear views of any industry insiders here on the development. That's why I posted this.

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PostPosted: Sep 07, 2017 12:46 pm 
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Emails: Toshiba, Westinghouse accused of deceit, malfeasance in run-up to South Carolina nuclear plant failure


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PostPosted: Sep 08, 2017 7:55 am 
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The Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant is a Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) nuclear reactor pair used for electric power generation. It is located on a 1,770-acre (7.2 km²) site in Rhea County, Tennessee, near Spring City, between the cities of Chattanooga and Knoxville. Watts Bar supplies enough electricity for about 1,200,000 households in the Tennessee Valley.

The plant, construction of which began in 1973, has two Westinghouse pressurized water reactor units: Unit 1, completed in 1996, and Unit 2, completed in 2015. Unit 1 has a winter net dependable generating capacity of 1,167 megawatts. Unit 2 has a capacity of 1,165 megawatts.

Unit 2 is the most recent civilian reactor to come on-line in the United States and the first new reactor to enter service in the United States after a 20-year hiatus.
An analysis conducted by the utilities after the Westinghouse bankruptcy showed the project, which was supposed to be finished by 2020 at a cost of about $14 billion, actually would have cost at least $21 billion and wouldn’t have been completed until years later.

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PostPosted: Sep 16, 2017 8:11 pm 
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Secret nuclear report should block SCANA from charging customers more, legislators told


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PostPosted: Sep 17, 2017 8:24 am 
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Westinghouse CEO looks beyond bankruptcy

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Westinghouse is working on a transformation plan that will take it "back to its fundamentals" by building on its core business, including fuel supply and reactor services. Gutierrez stressed that Westinghouse will no longer be involved in construction. "We are coming back to our previous business model that has been in engineering and procurement. That is where we have the right skills, the right abilities and right capacities."


Sounds to me like they're permanently out of the new reactor business.


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PostPosted: Sep 17, 2017 12:36 pm 
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Thank you for the posts, Kirk. I suppose if there were an expert subject analysis here on a forum devoted to non-water and namely molten salt designs—given that thorium is best utilized in the fluid phase and especially molten salts and not solid like at Shippingport—populated by experienced members, perhaps the overall view would be that this AP1000 experience continues to show the potential superiority of the molten salt technologies. One might think MSR tech deserves top priority help for development and is being held up by what?

Does Bechtel (A1B) have any MSR reports? I apologize for my neophyte questions. From the peanut gallery it seems MSRs do not require all the insane engineering overhead required of the water reactors? And if thorium is best utilized in molten salts, then leaders ought to acknowledge this basic fact. I wish the U.S. would succeed in the MSR competition because I love the USA, my home. And especially at Huntsville!

At least the two Vogtle AP1000s will go online?

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PostPosted: Sep 18, 2017 1:34 pm 
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It is 'back to basics' for Westinghouse and this sounds familiar: Areva, the French nuclear conglomerate, which was in very deep trouble, has also returned to its roots, more or less, after restructuring. Areva was formed out of Cogema (enrichment, reprocessing, fuel), Framatome (nuclear reactors and engineering) and Technicatome (naval and research reactors) in the early 2000s. Areva has basically gone full circle, as the constituent parts that once formed the mighty Areva are once again separate: Areva (fuel cycle business, now owned by the French state), Areva NP (reactor business, now owned by EDF) and Areva TA (now owned by a consortium, including the French state).


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PostPosted: Sep 19, 2017 9:47 am 
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Commission set to vote on scope of Vogtle, expansion schedule

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The Georgia Public Service Commission is set to vote Tuesday on the scope and schedule for Vogtle’s Semi-Annual Construction monitoring review, which it expects to rule on by February. Georgia Power wants the regulators to include approval “as reasonable” its revised total project cost estimate of $12.17 billion and its construction schedule, which defers completion of Units 3 and 4 until November 2021 and November 2022, respectively.


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PostPosted: Sep 19, 2017 1:00 pm 
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Wow. 2022. And demonstrated performance by 2025? If Flibe Energy for example had appropriate authorizations and financing, I have to wonder about the timeline. The ORNL MSRE total timeline was ten years? Fluid fueled using molten salts is not solid fueled water-cooled independent of location. The wonks can comment. This is the energy from thorium forum, right? I apologize for my inexperience in this crucial energy technology policy.

The U.S. Congress needs to return to regular order so vital domestic nuclear power laws can get decided and upgraded to include MSR tech. This is ridiculous. Our U.S. founders warned of partisan politics and it's divisiveness. All parties want prosperity and thorium MSR tech has the potential to generate a million times more power than that installed generating capacity AND with near-zero emissions! Notice President Trump's and Secretary Tillerson are open on climate change committments. Think thorium MSR tech that is essentially zero emissions a MILLION TIMES MORE POWERFUL!—energy to enable a new kind of economics and an economic upgrade;all prices are tied to energy prices. Is this naive? Maybe the experts here don't want to bother posting analysis?

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